Switch to Colemak/Dvorak

Its true! I can touch type without even looking at the monitor, with an average WPM of 60+ (most people can! Are you most people?), but then sometimes LOVE is not enough.

 

#1 Why?

QWERTY wasn’t designed with the user in mind (typewriter wins). More info: here & here

User productivity increases. Less fatigue – don’t have to worry about http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repetitive_strain_injury

Colemak etc are less prone to typos.

& for the sheer thrill in doing something new & rare (btw eight years ago I moved to Linux. No analogy! *Wink*)

 

#2 How?

Ideally all you need is an OS that understands the layout. All modern operating systems do.

That’s how you can switch layouts in Windows Ubuntu etc (just google).

 

Optionally, if you are like me – feedback is vital.

  • Let’s buy that keyboard?
  • Maybe those glowing stickers?
  • Ah! Just get me a screw driver X(

Pop the keys out and rearrange!

image

The red “i” has landed on the home row. Good stuff. Please don’t do that to your laptop. USB keyboard is pretty easy to acquire.

Downside: F & J have moved (if you know what I mean). #anchor #bump #ridges

 

#3 Next Steps

Learn

 

Q. All said and done – Why is QWERTY still in production?

A. I don’t have to answer that as we all know what will happen if you go to your manager/boss and ask him to sponsor this migration. For him all that’s expected out of you is that you ‘deliver’ – which you are already capable of.

 

Happy hacking!

 

PS: WPM has significantly gone down. But do not worry. #FreshStart

PPS: Yes! I used Colemak to write this post.

more stuff:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin-script_non-QWERTY_keyboards

 

Update (20130812):

Q. How to Switch in Android?

A. Google Keyboard is the answer. Get the app.

Settings — Language & Input — Google Keyboard — Advanced settings — Custom Input Styles — Add style (Currently it supports 6 layouts)

This is definitely cool. Gesture typing is fun.

Android-Colemak

Android-Colemak

VirtualBox vboxdrv problem on Ubuntu

Problem Statement:

#1

Kernel driver not installed (rc=-1908)

The VirtualBox Linux kernel driver (vboxdrv) is either not loaded or there is a permission problem with /dev/vboxdrv. Please reinstall the kernel module by executing


/etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup

as root. If it is available in your distribution, you should install the DKMS package first. This package keeps track of Linux kernel changes and recompiles the vboxdrv kernel module if necessary.

#2

Failed to open a session for the virtual machine “Windows XP”.

The virtual machine ‘Windows XP’ has terminated unexpectedly during startup with exit code 1.

(Running a virtual machine on VirtualBox the two dialogues would say that)

The cause — as the VirtualBox page states it:

Ubuntu/Debian users might want to install the dkms package to ensure that the VirtualBox host kernel modules (vboxdrv, vboxnetflt and vboxnetadp) are properly updated if the linux kernel version changes during the next apt-get upgrade.

The Fix:

The dkms package can be installed through the Synaptic Package manager or through the following command:

sudo apt-get install dkms

Running `virtualbox` in the terminal says almost the same thing…

$ virtualbox
WARNING: The vboxdrv kernel module is not loaded. Either there is no module
available for the current kernel (3.5.0-18-generic) or it failed to
load. Please recompile the kernel module and install it by

sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup

You will not be able to start VMs until this problem is fixed.
# You have heard the man!
$ sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup
* Stopping VirtualBox kernel modules [ OK ]
* Uninstalling old VirtualBox DKMS kernel modules [ OK ]
* Trying to register the VirtualBox kernel modules using DKMS
Error! Your kernel headers for kernel 3.5.0-18-generic cannot be found.
Please install the linux-headers-3.5.0-18-generic package,
or use the --kernelsourcedir option to tell DKMS where it's located

* Failed, trying without DKMS
* Recompiling VirtualBox kernel modules
* Look at /var/log/vbox-install.log to find out what went wrong
# Downloading the Linux Headers now
# sudo apt-get install linux-headers-3.5.0-18-generic
$ sudo apt-get install linux-headers-`uname -r`
# Running it again
$ sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup
* Stopping VirtualBox kernel modules                          [ OK ]
* Uninstalling old VirtualBox DKMS kernel modules             [ OK ]
* Trying to register the VirtualBox kernel modules using DKMS [ OK ]
* Starting VirtualBox kernel modules                          [ OK ]

All good!

Enable Hibernation on Ubuntu

One of those note-to-self posts!

Why does Ubuntu come with Hibernation disabled by default?

Ubuntu had to resort to such measures as users experienced a lot of issues like:

  • No resume after suspending the PC — in a limbo
  • Open files and folders gone — Shutdown instead of hibernation
  • Wifi etc devices not working after waking up — the worst nightmare

And that happened because there wasn’t enough Hardware support. Even in Ubuntu derivatives like Linux Mint it came disabled.

What is hibernation?

Seriously? Forget it. I am not even going to look at you.

Alright Alright suit yourself: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/PowerManagement/Hibernate

Advantages of Hibernation:

  • You have an edge over “suspending”. It saves power.
  • The exact state of the computer is resumed.
  • Major use case for the people who leave their  PCs unattended (think: http://Torrentz.in)

How to enable it in Ubuntu:

Step#1 Check if hibernate works on your hardware.

  • Open Terminal (CTRL + ALT + T)
  • Save your work first and then type
 $ sudo pm-hibernate 
  • If everything goes smoothly, start your laptop and continue iff things look good.
  • If you see anything unexpected then please make sure that the size of SWAP is at least as large as the RAM or just 
     System.exit(1) 

Step#2 You can continue to use that command safely or make it permanent by enabling it on the menu (do it only if Step#1 above works)

Open terminal and type:

 $ sudo gedit /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/com.ubuntu.enable-hibernate.pkla 

Enter the password

(instead of `gedit` you can use `vi` its awesome)

hit “i”; paste; hit “ESC”; hit “:”; hit “x”

Step#3 Paste the following lines in the blank file you created just now.

[Re-enable hibernate by default]
Identity=unix-user:*
Action=org.freedesktop.upower.hibernate
ResultActive=yes

Hit Save and Quit.

Step#4 Reboot for the changes to take effect.

If upon restart you still cannot see the “Hibernate” item in the menu, then you need to Tweak the Grub but mostly it would not come to that.

And we’re back …

Also check http://nikunjlahoti.com/2012/04/29/ubuntu-12-04-fix-fn-brightness-keys/

Sources:

https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/ubuntu-help/power-hibernate.html

https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/ubuntu-help/power-suspendfail.html

Ubuntu fix Fn Brightness keys

So my Acer Aspire 5738 encountered the oh-the-Brightness-Function-keys-are-not-working-yet-again issue after the installation of Ubuntu 12.04. There is a simple fix and some related caveats. So here we go …..

#1 (open the file in gedit or vi)

$ sudo vi /etc/default/grub
[sudo] password for nikunj:

#2 (find an insert the arguments in gray)

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=”quiet splash acpi_osi=Linux acpi_backlight=vendor

#3 (update the grub configuration)

$ sudo update-grub
Generating grub.cfg …
Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-24-generic
Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.2.0-24-generic
Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-23-generic
Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.2.0-23-generic
Found memtest86+ image: /boot/memtest86+.bin
Found Windows 7 (loader) on /dev/sda1
Found Ubuntu 11.10 (11.10) on /dev/sda2
done

Just reboot the machine.

Caveats:

At times the screen would go entirely dark. Or would not apparently resume from a blank screen or when the screensaver gets active.

For such cases, all you need to do is press “Fn + Brightness UP button” and screen will GLOW. Simple!!

(This post is more like a NOTE TO SELF. But if it helps you in someway then its even better … AWESOME!! :D)

Update:

Works for Ubuntu 12.10 perfectly 🙂

Update (2013/01/08):

You can use “sudo gedit /etc/default/grub” if you are not very familiar with vi editor! 🙂

Update (2013/05/12):

For Ubuntu 13.04 do the following:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=”quiet splash acpi_osi=Linux acpi_backlight=vendor

Update (2014/05/25):

Works on Ubuntu 14.04.